Wednesday, December 30, 2009

Counselors and Clerks


Hello Dear Reader,
The Stake Presidency told Grandpa (Wes) Carter to go home and pray about who he should have for counselors and clerks and report back to them by the middle of the week. He knew without any doubt who his counselors should be--he chose Arland Olsen as 1st counselor and Blaine Houtz as 2nd counselor; he chose LeMar Mangum as ward clerk with Russell Walker as financial clerk.

His counselors had both been teammates on the Pioneer Ward Basketball team. Blaine was 21 years old and had just returned from a mission, but Wes had prayed about this several times and always got the same answer--Blaine should be a counselor. Here's a photo of the basketball team they played on. Arland (Cory) is number 5; Blaine, 6; and Wes, 11. Isn't it interesting how lives seem to connect and paths cross?
Love,
Aunt Genni

Monday, December 28, 2009

A Call in the Night

Hello Dear Reader,
About April 1, 1951 Grandpa (Wes) and Grandma (Mary) Carter were awakened by a ringing phone. It was April Fool's day but Grandpa got up and answered the phone anyway. It was President J. Earl Lewis wanting Wes and Mary to come to his office as soon as they could get there.

President Lewis and his counselors interviewed them and asked if Wes would accept the calling of bishop in the new ward that was to be created. Wes said, "Yes," and was counseled to go home and pray about who he would like for counselors and clerks. He was to report back to them by the middle of the week. Wes was 32 years old and Mary was 30. What a huge responsibility for such a young couple.
Love,
Aunt Genni

Sunday, December 27, 2009

Rumors

Hello Dear Reader,
Early in the spring of 1951 rumors were going around that Rivergrove Ward was to be divided. There was much speculation who the new bishop would be. Grandpa (Wes) said to Grandma (Mary Hall) Carter, "I know who the new bishop is going to be." When Grandma asked, "Who?" Grandpa replied, "Me."

Mary was concerned that Wes would be let down if he wasn't called as bishop but he said, "No I won't because I know they will call me." How's that for confidence?
Love,
Aunt Genni

Saturday, December 26, 2009

Growing Confidence

Hello Dear Reader,
When Grandpa (Wes) became active he became really active. It wasn't long until he was called to be Sunday School superintendent. Meanwhile he and Mary participated in church dances and other activities. He really began to love being in the spotlight. In fact, he became quite the thespian and participated in several plays and skits. He also continued to play church basketball and softball. As he became acquainted with more people he became more and more confident.

This is a photo of Wes Carter, Corey Olsen, Harold Curtiss, and Odessa Snow in the play, "The Haunted House." It was performed in the Rivergrove Ward.
Love,
Aunt Genni

Friday, December 25, 2009

The Carter Children

Merry Christmas Dear Reader,
When we were young and Grandma (Mary Carter) had a photographer come to take our portraits she always hired Mr. Massey. He fooled around and fiddled until it drove her to distraction--and she gave him the nickname "Messy Massey." But he did a good job and so she would call him again the next time. Here is my Christmas present to you this year--Kent, Carol, Marilyn, and LeAnn. I hope you are having a wonderful Christmas!
Love,
Aunt Genni

Thursday, December 24, 2009

Christmas Eve

Hello Dear Reader,
Christmas eve was almost as wonderful as Christmas morning because it was Grandpa's birthday--or so we thought. We usually had our Christmas dinner on Christmas eve because it was Grandpa's birthday dinner. We came to think that was the best time to have it; the next day the refrigerator was filled with leftovers that we could eat as we wanted.

When we were very young Uncle Elmo (Carter), Wes's brother had the most wonderful Santa Claus suit and he always made a trip to our house in the evening. He wore sleigh bells across his chest and came running up the sidewalk singing in his beautiful baritone voice, "Here comes Santa Claus." He would come in the front door (remember we didn't have a fireplace) and acted surprised that we weren't in bed yet. Then he took each one on his knee and asked us to remind him what we had asked for. Then he sang a few Christmas songs with us, told us to get to bed so he could come back when we were asleep, and ran out the door and down the sidewalk singing.

Is it any wonder I love Christmas?
Love,
Aunt Genni

Wednesday, December 23, 2009

Christmas Season

Hello Dear Reader,
When I think of Christmas I always think of family. Grandpa (Wes) and Grandma (Mary) Carter made Christmas really fun for us children. I think I already described what our Christmas trees were like back then but the tree was just the beginning of a wonderful time of the year.

One year I asked for a table, a set of play dishes, and a cowgirl outfit for my doll. Grandpa built me a table with drop leaves and Grandma made me a new outfit for my doll. I treasured these gifts from Santa. I also got the set of dishes I asked for. They were tin and painted in the "Blue Willow" pattern. I loved them.

We always hung our stockings on the arm of a chair on Christmas eve. We didn't have a fireplace. The girls definitely had the advantage back then because we wore long brown stockings that we attached to our undershirts with garters. On Christmas morning our stockings had an orange in the toe, nuts, and candy (those cheap chocolate drops that my children hated) along with hard tack. I have such fond memories of Christmas.
Love,
Aunt Genni

Tuesday, December 22, 2009

LDS Girls--Aaronic Priesthood Banquet

Hello Dear Readers,
I'm not sure you'll be able to see the young people in this picture very well but I thought I should post it. Grandma (Mary) Carter is in front on the right in a white blouse and Grandpa (Wes) Carter is standing in back on the right in a white shirt. I recognize Frankie Killpack and other faces look familiar, but I couldn't put a name to a face.
Love,
Aunt Genni

Monday, December 21, 2009

More Personal Growth


Hello Dear Reader,
Gradually Grandpa (Wesley) Carter's leadership ability began to emerge. I thought you might like to see what he looked like when he was in the Sunday School Superintendency. Here is a picture of him counseling a deacon before Sunday School. The deacon is Dick Olsen.
Love,
Aunt Genni

Sunday, December 20, 2009

Meeting Schedule

Hello Dear Reader,
When Grandpa (Wesley) Carter was put in the Sunday School superintendency the meeting schedule was different than it is now. We went to church in the morning on Sunday, usually about 10 o'clock and were there for 1-1/2 hours. The meeting consisted of opening exercises with a sacrament hymn, sacrament, and 2-1/2 minute talks. There was also singing practice and other business, then about an hour in class. After that we went home for dinner and returned in the evening for another 2 hour service where we partook of the sacrament again and listened to two speakers.

All of the auxiliary meetings were during the week. Primary was usually on Tuesday or Wednesday after school. Relief Society was held one morning each week and Mutual was held one evening each week. Priesthood meeting was on Sunday morning before Sunday School. I think I like it better the way it is now.
Love,
Aunt Genni

Saturday, December 19, 2009

End of the Semester

Hello Dear Reader,
The semester is over. The papers are in. The finals are taken. Even the Christmas cards are written. It's been a hard semester for me--possibly because I missed Mom, possibly because it's just hard to get this old brain working and unthinking bad habits picked up over the years. I would like to say that I'll do better about blogging next semester--and that is a possible New Year's resolution--but I'll just have to see. I have 2 days to organize, pack, and leave for Florida for Christmas.

It will be wonderful to see my girls and grandchildren. I think I look forward to seeing my sons-in-law too (just kidding Patrick and David; I'm anxious to see you as well).

My "Historian's Craft" class was hard but I learned a lot about researching and a lot about New Portage, Ohio and the events that took place there. That's where Eliza Darrow Fifield Bates McNeill lived with at least 2 of her husbands. My paper ended up being 11 pages + bibliography. If anyone is interested in reading it let me know.

I'll try to post a couple more times before I leave for Christmas break.
Love,
Aunt Genni

Sunday, October 4, 2009

Apology

Hello Dear Reader,
I have to apologize. I still have a lot more to write about Grandpa (Wesley Carol) and Grandma (Mary Hall) Carter. I have lots of pictures to post and more events I hope you will find interesting. Getting started in a new semester has been difficult for me. I find myself spinning my wheels a lot but since I already have a grade for this blog it is not top on my list of priorities right now.

I'm hoping things will settle down this week. Sometimes I can post a lot at one time and then just have the posts appear on schedule. Don't give up on me yet. I will see what I can do. If it becomes too difficult I will take a hiatus for a while. But I think it will be ok.
Love,
Aunt Genni

Sunday, September 20, 2009

Growth in the Church

Hello Dear Reader,
As Grandpa (Wes) Carter became more at ease in his position as a teacher he was asked to pray and even gave a two-and-a- half minute talk—which he said he did very poorly. After about seven or eight months of teaching Sunday school the second counselor in the SS superintendency, Brother Thurgood, moved away.

Bishop Dunford asked Wes to his office along with Earl Johnson and Claude Billings who was Sunday school superintendent. The bishop asked Wes to be 2nd counselor in the superintendency. He gladly accepted. He had grown a lot during that short period of time.
Love,
Aunt Genni

Sunday, September 13, 2009

Becoming a Teacher

Hello Dear Reader,
The bishopric eventually, after visiting with Grandpa (Wes), asked him to teach a Sunday school class—the twelve year olds. Wes’s first reaction was a firm, “No.” “But,” he said, “After a few minutes of friendly persuasion, I consented—with reservations.” He told them if they ever asked him to pray or talk in church he would never go back.

Wes managed to get through the first Sunday but didn’t go the next week. That evening Bishop Dunford showed up at the Carter home and asked Wes why he hadn’t been at Sunday school that day. He replied that he wasn’t a teacher and he couldn’t stand the noise of the bratty kids.

The bishop told Wes some in the class liked him and he hoped Wes would return. Wes decided to try. He taught the class several months and learned to love those children very much. He remembered all of his first students the rest of his life.
Love,
Aunt Genni

Saturday, September 12, 2009

A Little Kindness

Hello Dear Reader,
It’s been a while since I posted here. New semesters are always stressful but this one has seemed particularly so. I apologize for the lack and will try to do better.

After Grandma (Mary Hall) Carter returned from Las Vegas to Provo with her four children the family settled into a routine. It wasn’t long until Bishop Dunford along with his counselors, Leo Taylor and Andy Terry, arrived at the Carter household. Grandpa (Wes) answered their knock and gruffly asked, “What do you want?” They must have appeared kind and unflappable as they replied that they had come to visit. Wes relented in his attitude, invited them in, and asked them to sit down. Wes always said, “A little kindness goes a long way.”
Love,
Aunt Genni

Tuesday, September 1, 2009

In Las Vegas, Then Back to Provo


Hello Dear Reader,
Here are a couple of photos taken in Las Vegas while Mary and the children were there the summer of 1946.

While we were away Wes used his free time to remodel and make an addition to the house in Provo. He could hardly wait for his family to return to see what he had done. Also, I’m sure he missed us very much because he was devoted to his family.
Love,
Aunt Genni

Monday, August 31, 2009

Orneriness

Hello Dear Reader,
After Grandma (Mary Hall) Carter had been released from the hospital a few days Grandma (Caroline) Hall took Mary and all four children to Las Vegas on the train. The three older children were recovering from the mumps. I don’t know how long we spent in Vegas while Grandma Hall helped with the new baby and she and Grandpa (Laning) Hall enjoyed playing with the children and taking care of their daughter.

I often heard the story of Wes taking us to the train to see us off and trying to get me to say, “Bye, bye.” Instead I stuck out my tongue and said, “Bah, bah, Daddy.” I guess I was ornery even at that young age. Now you know—it’s in my nature!
Love,
Aunt Genni

Sunday, August 30, 2009

Pampered Childbirth

Hello Dear Reader,
Grandpa (Wes) and Grandma (Mary) Carter’s third daughter and fourth child, LeAnn, was born in July of 1946. Mary’s mother, Caroline Hall, traveled to Provo and stayed with the other children while Mary was in the hospital with her baby. In those days new mothers were usually confined for ten days. I remember Mary saying by the time they were released from the hospital new mothers were weak from lying in bed so long. It took them longer to recover from the ordeal because they were so pampered. Those were the “good old days.”
Love,
Aunt Genni

Thursday, August 27, 2009

Update

Hello Dear Reader,
Sort and organize, sort and organize. I think that is my lot in life. I can hardly believe school starts Monday and I'm still sorting through papers from Grandma (Mary) Carter's house. I have come to the conclusion that Newfamilysearch will be the way for you to gain access to any genealogical information you might want in the future.

Newfamilysearch will probably be available for us here in Provo in October. Many professors have cautioned that we use care in what we submit and any corrections that we make. If a lot of people dump in information without checking what's already available the system could crash.

Once the program is available to me I will add what I can for your information.
Love,
Aunt Genni

Monday, August 24, 2009

A Family Photo


Hello Dear Reader,
I found this old photo among Grandma (Mary Hall) Carter's albums and thought you might like to see it. From left to right are Kent, Marilyn (baby) Grandpa (Laning) Hall, Carol, Grandma (Caroline Ferguson) Hall, Bert and Mary. Mary wrote, "This is what the house at 572 North 970 West looked like when we moved in. I don't ever remember it looking like this. Actually, before it was 970 West it was considered 10th West. I remember learning that address when I started kindergarten and then, when they changed it to 970 West, I had to learn it all over again. Life can be tough when you're a little kid.
Love,
Aunt Genni

Wednesday, August 19, 2009

Returning to Church

Hello Dear Reader,
Up to the time of my birth Grandpa (Wes) and Grandma (Mary) Carter were only occasional church goers. Mary talked to the bishop and decided she wanted to be more actively involved again. On one occasion Wes went hunting on Sunday and when he returned home Mary and the children were ready to go to Sacrament Meeting.

He complained about her leaving him alone but she replied (in Wes’s words, “firmly but frankly”), “If you want to spend Sunday evening with me and the children you’re going to have to go with us.” He reluctantly put on his suit but said if they (the leaders) ever called on him to pray or talk he would never go back. They didn’t bother him for a long time.
Love,
Aunt Genni

Monday, August 17, 2009

A Side Note

Hello Dear Reader,
Last night we returned from a quick trip to Vancouver, Washington where we attended Dave’s 50th class reunion, an “old timers’” reunion for the Vancouver Ward, and celebrated his dad’s 95th birthday. It was a good trip and I was able to cram a lot into the two days we were there.

One of my jaunts was to the Clark County Historical Society and Museum where I hoped to find records of some shirttail relatives of Mark G. Fifield and his mother, Eliza. I had learned on-line that these relatives were buried in Vancouver. The first thing the volunteers asked was who I was looking for. When I replied, “Jeremiah and Electra Bates Hathaway,” they asked if I was the person who had just sent the e-mail about their journal.

Of course I knew nothing about the e-mail and didn’t know that a journal existed. But apparently Jeremiah and Electra kept an overland journal of their trip along the Oregon Trail. The Hathaways were some of the earliest settlers of the Vancouver/Portland area. The Society is trying to locate the journal now and promised to let me know if they find it. They also said they would give the man who sent the inquiry my e-mail address and tell him of my interest if he wants to contact me. I am always amazed at the possibilities that open when I make a little effort towards my book.
Love,
Aunt Genni

Sunday, August 16, 2009

Taylor & Carter Construction Company

Hello Dear Reader,
The job at Wendover ended the latter part of February but World Ward II was in its final stages and there was plenty of work available. Ray Taylor had started a new home for himself and Grandpa (Wes) worked for him for a couple of weeks.

Ray suggested that he and Wes go into business as a partnership. As that was agreeable they took out their contractors’ licenses and came up with the name Taylor and Carter Construction Company. They were in business for themselves! There was so much work available they had to turn a lot of it down.
Love,
Aunt Genni

Saturday, August 15, 2009

Impeccable Timing

Hello Dear Reader,
While working at Wendover Wes traveled home weekends to see Mary and the children. Mary was pregnant and the children were growing quickly.

One weekend he returned to Provo, played with the children, and took Mary to the movies. When they got home Mary’s labor began. Wes took her to the hospital and I was born. Both Wes and Mary thought my timing was impeccable. Wes didn’t miss any work and went back to Wendover Sunday night. Kent went to Las Vegas to stay with Grandpa and Grandma Hall. Mary took Carol and I and stayed with Aunt Myrl in Midvale.
Love,
Aunt Genni

Friday, August 14, 2009

Constructing Airport Runways

Hello Dear Reader,
The project Grandpa (Wes) Carter was working on in Wendover was an airport. The B-29 bomber had just been built and this airport was the first in the world capable of accomodating the big plane for landing and repairs.

Wes worked for only a few days when Rolf Christiansen appointed him foreman. He was responsible for all the concrete runways—to see that they were properly formed and poured for the huge B-29.
Love,
Aunt Genni

Thursday, August 13, 2009

Wes Goes to Wendover

Hello Dear Reader,
Grandpa (Wes) Carter was not in the service nor was he employed. He found work with Christiansen Construction Company out of Salt Lake at Wendover, Utah on the Nevada boarder. That left Mary at home alone once more. But she had these two adorable children to keep her company.
Love,
Aunt Genni

Wednesday, August 12, 2009

A Happy Reunion

Hello Dear Reader,
When Mary and Deon arrived at Fort Douglas they were unable to learn anything about Wes—where he was or what had happened to him. When they arrived back in Lehi there he was sitting on Deon’s front porch. The house was locked because no one was there. He had been feeling very sorry for himself after having told everyone good-bye and he dreaded going back to face everyone and explain that he was 4-F.

Mary told Wes that that was the happiest day of her life. She and Deon thought he had been shipped out. I’m sure her enthusiasm at seeing him again made him feel much better and ready to face the questions that were sure to come as they returned to Provo.
Love,
Aunt Genni

Tuesday, August 11, 2009

Crossing Paths

Hello Dear Reader,
Grandma (Mary Hall) Carter became concerned about Wes. She called Aunt Deon (Wes’s sister) who lived in Lehi and asked her to go with her to Fort Douglas to see if they could discover what had happened to him. Apparently Mary picked Deon up and they headed to Salt Lake.

Meanwhile, the Army officials told Wes he could not be accepted for service because of his physical condition. He was released from the hospital and proceeded to hitchhike to Lehi which was much closer than Provo.
Love,
Aunt Genni

Saturday, August 8, 2009

Fort Douglas

Hello Dear Reader,
The draft board called Wes into the Service so he, Ray, and Jim broke up their building partnership. Mary was pregnant again (with me) so this became a stressful time for the Carters. Wes left his little family and went to Fort Douglas in Salt Lake to be inducted into the US Army.

During his first physical examination the doctor discovered he had a slight heart condition. Those in charge put him in bed and kept him there while they examined him two or three times each day for two or three days. Meanwhile, Mary heard nothing from him and wondered what on earth was happening.
Love,
Aunt Genni

Thursday, August 6, 2009

Moving On

Hello Dear Reader,
About the time that Wes and Mary moved into their own home Wes’s work on the aqueduct was finished. He got in touch with a man by the name of Victor Smith (not our uncle) who was planning to build a home. Wes was able to contract the labor and he hired Ray Taylor, his former partner, and Jim Freshwater, who lived just down the street, to work for him.

After that house was built, the three men went into partnership and did two or three small jobs. But World War II was happening and a new adventure was awaiting Wes.
Love,
Aunt Genni

Tuesday, August 4, 2009

A Home of Their Own

Hello Dear Reader,
Early in the spring Wes and Mary moved out of the house at 1100 West 500 North and bought a little unfinished two-bedroom house at 572 North 970 West. The house was lacking many amenities including an inside toilet. The cold water came in through the wall in the kitchen. Their kitchen stove was a coal stove. They had very little furniture. But they were happy because the house was theirs to add on to and do with as they pleased.

I assume they paid cash for their house because they never, in their whole married life, had a mortgage.
Love,
Aunt Genni

Monday, August 3, 2009

A Baby Girl--Happy Birthday Today

Hello Dear Reader,
At the time of Grandpa (Edward F.) Carter’s death Mary was expecting another baby. Wes and Mary sold their trailer and rented a house from Herman and Bertie Allred at 1100 West 5th North. When Carol was born August 3, 1942, they took their new baby girl home from the hospital to that house.

The house had coal stoves and when winter arrived Wes and Mary found the stoves inadequate for heat. Both Kent and Carol got pneumonia. Carol was so sick she had to be hospitalized for some time. This was another trying time for new parents.
Love,
Aunt Genni

Sunday, August 2, 2009

Happy Birthday Dear Grandma


Hello Dear Reader,
Today was Grandma (Mary) Carter's birthday. I hope she had a wonderful celebration with all of her loved ones "on the other side."
Love,
Aunt Genni

Friday, July 31, 2009

Gaining Experience

Hello Dear Reader,
Grandpa (Wesley) Carter’s new boss’s name was Harvey Walters. He made Wes lead foreman on his crew along with a man by the name of Ray Taylor. Wes and Ray worked together as partners. It wasn’t long until Harvey, Wes, and Ray became close friends and they and their wives socialized once in a while.

When work on the steel plant ended Ray and Wes went to work for the American Asbestos and Magnesium Company as millwrights. When that job ended Wes worked for Walker and Walker Construction Company building a water aqueduct from Deer Creek reservoir to the point of the mountain. He was lead foreman again. He was gaining leadership experience and making friends with each new job.
Love,
Aunt Genni

Wednesday, July 29, 2009

Wes's Father, Edward Furlsbury Carter


Hello Dear Reader,
Edward Furlsbury Carter was born 10 Jun 1878 in Santaquin, Utah. He married Annie Blake on May 6, 1903 in the Salt Lake Temple. They were the parents of 10 children, eight of whom lived to adulthood. He died June 1, 1942 of cancer. You can read his history and learn a little more about him by going to The Family Thicket. His information can be accessed from the home page or from the site map. He was dearly loved by his family.
Love,
Aunt Genni

Tuesday, July 28, 2009

Good News--and Bad

Hello Dear Reader,
Because Grandpa (Wes) Carter had become a very qualified carpenter his foreman, Hank Willinger, made him the lead carpenter on his crew. This gave Wes the opportunity to do much layout work and he was always given the better jobs such as hanging doors and doing inside finish work.

But, as usual, sometimes when we think things are great we’re blindsided. Hank went back into the Navy and about the same time Wes got a call, probably from Mary as she was there, telling him that his father had died.
Love,
Aunt Genni

Monday, July 27, 2009

Construction of Geneva Steel Mill

Hello Dear Reader,
Mary wrote to Wes telling him that a steel plant was going to be built in Vineyard near Provo. The steel mill, named Geneva after a resort once located near Utah Lake, was to be built there because the location was far inland from the west coast making it safer from possible Japanese attacks.

Wes returned to Provo again and was one of the first carpenters to be hired. He helped build most of the temporary facilities for the project. This is what Geneva Steel looked like in November 1942 while under construction.
Love,
Aunt Genni

Sunday, July 26, 2009

Back to Fort Huachuca

Hello Dear Reader,
Grandpa (Wes) soon got work as a carpenter at a small arms plant in Salt Lake. He and Mary bought a trailer house and parked it in a trailer park in Salt Lake for a few weeks. Then, presumably to save money and be close to family, they moved it onto Uncle Vern and Aunt Myrl (Hall) Bray’s property in Midvale. They lived there until the job was completed. After that they pulled their trailer to Provo and parked it behind Grandpa (Ed) and Grandma (Annie) Carter’s house at 1200 West 5th North.

World War II had begun but work was still slack in Utah. Wes went back to Fort Huachuca where they were building a big addition to the fort. This time Mary and Kent stayed in Utah.
Love,
Aunt Genni

Friday, July 24, 2009

Home for the 24th

Hello Dear Reader,
It was the middle of July and very hot when Grandpa (Wes) and Grandma (Mary) Carter loaded everything they owned into their small Plymouth Coupe and headed back to Provo. Wes said, “What a miserable trip! . . . It was a mighty hot 1,000 mile trip to Utah.” They were happy to be reunited with their families and show off their new baby. They were home in time to enjoy the Pioneer Day celebration.

By the way, Happy Pioneer Day everyone. We owe a lot to our pioneer ancestors.
Love,
Aunt Genni

Thursday, July 23, 2009

Winding It Up in Arizona

Hello Dear Reader,
When Kent was well enough Grandpa (Wes) and Grandma (Mary) made the long journey over the hot desert to have him blessed in the Bisbee Ward. It is about 45 miles from Fort Huachuca to Bisbee. Today it takes about an hour and twenty minutes to make the trip. Back then it probably took at least twice as long.

The job at the fort was nearing completion. Wes, Verl Croft, and the foreman, Owen Radford, were the only civilians left employed at the base. Mary and Wes decided it was time to return to their families in Utah.
Love,
Aunt Genni

Wednesday, July 22, 2009

An Answer to Prayer


Hello Dear Reader,
Taking Kent to Major Moore was an unusual situation because army doctors were not allowed to treat civilian patients. But Dr. Moore was able to diagnose the situation immediately and Grandpa and Grandma Carter considered him an answer to their prayers. Wes said, “He informed us that the formula was all wrong and the baby was starving. We started feeding him whole milk with a tablespoon of real cream in it.”

Kent started to gain weight and improve in health. He was a beautiful baby with large blue eyes and black eye lashes.
Love,
Aunt Genni

Tuesday, July 21, 2009

Great Concern

Hello Dear Reader,
After Grandma (Mary) Carter recuperated from giving birth she and Wes moved to Miller Canyon so they could be closer to Fort Huachuca and Wes’s work. They rented a small, two-room cabin with meager furnishings.

Wes said this: “Our baby had never really been well. He was a very small premature baby when he was born and we were never able to get anything to agree with him. He seemed to get worse each day and we were very concerned as there was no place to go for help for him.” This was a great worry to the new parents.
Love,
Aunt Genni

Monday, July 20, 2009

First Child

Hello Dear Reader,
After several months of living in Fry and because Grandma (Mary Hall) Carter was pregnant she and Wes moved to Bisbee where Mary could be near a doctor. Bisbee was 45 miles from Wes’s work so he drove ninety miles each day and, remember, this was long before freeways were even thought of.

Wesley Kent Carter, Wes and Mary’s first child, was born in the Copper Queen Hospital. According to Grandma (Mary), “It was too soon and [he was] too small. We nearly lost him. In desperation we finally took him to the fort to a [Colonel] Major Moore who helped to get him started.”
Love,
Aunt Genni

Friday, July 17, 2009

Vital Statistics

Hello Dear Reader,
Here are some family vital statistics: Wes was 5’ 10½“tall. He was a dish-water blond with blue eyes. He had the ruddy complexion of a red head. His eyebrows were completely blond. He had full lips that always seemed chapped. His eyes were very sensitive to the sun and often bloodshot. He said his “favorite color was sky-blue pink, the color of his eyes.”

Mary was 5’3” tall and small boned. She had black hair and green eyes. She had large hip bones and said she had inherited “the Ferguson hips.” Her shoulders were very narrow so she was definitely pear shaped. One of her distinguishing features was her hearty, infectious laugh. That trait was one that all of the Halls shared.
Love,
Aunt Genni

Thursday, July 16, 2009

True Love

Hello Dear Reader,
After Grandma (Mary) Carter arrived in Arizona she and Wes found a shortage of housing. The only place they could find was a big, old deserted house in the town of Fry. Apparently Verl Croft’s wife and children arrived at about the same time as Mary (maybe they caravanned or traveled together) because the Croft family lived in one room, Wes and Mary lived in another room, and yet another couple lived in a back room.

They had no electricity, no heat, no water, and no bathroom facilities. They used boxes for chairs, orange crates for cupboards, and a new garbage can with ice in it for a refrigerator. They bought used bed springs and a table. They lived in this manner for several months. True love!
Love,
Aunt Genni

Wednesday, July 15, 2009

Mary Arrives in Arizona



Hello Dear Reader,
I thought you might like to see some early photographs of Wes and Mary. The first one is of Wes sitting on the running board of his 1933 Plymouth coupe playing with his dog, Blackie. The second one is of Wes and Mary when they were a young, newly-married couple. There you go!
Love,
Aunt Genni

Tuesday, July 14, 2009

United Again

Hello Dear Reader,
Fort Huachuca was a Negro army camp and Wes Carter, Verl Croft, Don Davis, and Ren Barney built barracks. In the beginning they lived in unfinished barracks the construction company furnished for their employees. It wasn’t long until Wes and Verl were given the best jobs on the project because they were such good carpenters. They became friends with the foreman, Owen Radford, and his wife.

Wes saved his money for several weeks until he had enough to send for Mary. She drove their old car down accompanied by their half-cocker spaniel, Blackie. That must have been a scary trip for a young wife. It was 600 miles.
Love,
Aunt Genni

Monday, July 13, 2009

Work in Arizona

Hello Dear Reader,
Grandpa (Wes) Carter was able to save a little money and decided to go to Fort Huachuca, Arizona where carpenters were being hired for construction of a new army camp. He pooled his resources with Don Davis, Ren Barney, and Verl Croft who had all worked with him at the power plant and they left Provo in Ren Barney's car for Arizona.

Fort Huachuca is located below Tucson on the Mexican border. When these men arrived they got work immediately. Wes’s starting wage was $70.00 a week—people back home could hardly imagine that that amount of money could or would be paid a carpenter. While he was in Provo he thought $20 a week was a lot.
Love,
Aunt Genni

Saturday, July 11, 2009

More Traditions

Hello Dear Reader,
Let's get back to the traditions that Wes and Mary began as newly weds. Sometime during the Christmas season they made candy—traditionally fudge and divinity but sometimes pulled taffy. Wes usually made the divinity. It is one of the few things I remember him cooking and he did it well. Here is the recipe:

GRANDPA’S DIVINITY
2 cups sugar
2 egg whites, beaten until very stiff
½ cup white corn syrup
½ cup water
1 teaspoon vanilla
½ cup chopped walnuts, optional

Mix sugar, syrup and water. Stir until sugar is dissolved. Bring mixture to a boil and cook without stirring until hard, almost brittle when dropped in cold water. Pour slowly over egg whites, beating constantly. Continue to beat until it creams or until it looses its glossiness and becomes dull. Add vanilla and nuts, if desired. Drop from a spoon. (Divinity is better if kept in a covered container overnight.)

Christmas dinner usually took place on the afternoon of Christmas Eve in celebration of Wes’s birthday. Then there was time for family parties and reading the Christmas story from the Book of Luke before bed. Wes and Mary opened their gifts on Christmas morning and then visited parents, brothers, and sisters to see “what Santa brought,” and exclaim over wonderful gifts. Christmas was always anticipated and the season was full of love and joy.
Love,
Aunt Genni

Friday, July 10, 2009

More Wedding Details

Hello Dear Reader,
The article in the Evening Herald went on: “A beautiful gown of white satin was worn by the bride, and her fingertip veil of net edged with lace, fell from a crown of seed pearls. She carried pink rosebuds. All the attendants wore dainty taffeta frocks, in blue, salmon, and lavender, respectively, and corsages of sweet peas and rosebuds.

“The bride’s father acted as master of ceremonies, and during dancing, a program was furnished. Refreshments were served all evening. The beautiful gifts were in charge of Mrs. Lois Black of Castle Dale, sister of the bride.

“The young couple are spending a few days in southern Utah, and will return to make their home in Provo.” This last sentence surprises me. If they did go to southern Utah I never heard about it and neither one wrote anything about it in their histories.
Love,
Aunt Genni

Back to the Wedding

Hello Dear Reader,
I apologize but I need to go back in Grandpa (Wes) and Grandma (Mary) Carter’s story as I just found a newspaper article giving more details of their wedding.

The heading says, “Many Provoans At Wedding In Spanish Fork.” After stating where and when the reception was held the article went on: “The delightful affair was largely attended and the guests were received by the parents of the bride and groom; Boyd Christiansen of Provo, best man; the groom and bride; Mrs. Lila Madsen of Provo, cousin of the bride, matron of honor, and Miss Mary Ellen Argyle of Lake Shore, friend, and Mrs. Maurita Carter, Sister-in-law of the groom, bridesmaids.

Aunt Rita (Maurita) became a bridesmaid at the last moment because Aunt Angie (Wes’s younger sister), who was supposed to have that honor, had eloped with Morris Cameron and they were in Las Vegas getting married that day.
Love,
Aunt Genni

Thursday, July 9, 2009

Beginning Christmas Traditions

Hello Dear Reader,
Grandpa (Wesley) Carter continued to work on the addition to the Provo City power plant until after the first of the year when it was closed down for the winter. “But,” he said, “We had a wonderful Christmas and holiday together.”

That was the beginning of their tradition of special Christmases. Shopping for just the right Christmas tree was a big deal and it was decorated with great care. First the colored lights went on and had to be evenly spaced. Next the ornaments, colored glass balls and toys, were placed on each branch. Last the silver-colored icicles which were made of lead were hung. It seemed to take hours to hang each individual strand. The icicles were heavy and hung beautifully when separated from each other and carefully placed so the ends never looped but were straight. The tree was totally covered with them. I wish I had a picture of a tree decorated this way so you could see how beautiful they looked back then.
Love,
Aunt Genni

Tuesday, July 7, 2009

First Apartment

Hello Dear Reader,
After their wedding Grandpa (Wes) and Grandma (Mary) lived with their parents—going between the Halls and the Carters is the way I imagine it. But as soon as Wes had his first payday the newlyweds rented their first apartment. The cost was $18 a month. The apartment was located on 2nd East and 5th South in Provo. They were very happy there. I don't know which house their apartment was in but this will give you an idea of the area as it looks now. Love,
Aunt Genni

Monday, July 6, 2009

Unemployed

Hello Dear Reader,
Wes continued to work as a carpenter for Axel Christiansen but soon after his marriage to Mary the house the company was building was finished and the job they anticipated fell through. Wes was unemployed. It wasn’t long until the money he and Mary had saved was gone. He joined the Union and went to Salt Lake where he found work at the municipal airport building. He worked one day before he was fired.

He started looking again and looked for two or three weeks. Finally, the job the Christiansens expected, an addition to Provo City Power plant, started up. Not only did Wes have work but he got a raise. He was now making 50¢ an hour for a total of $20 a week. He said, “We were rich!”
Love,
Aunt Genni

Sunday, July 5, 2009

The Following Day


Hello Dear Reader,
The day following the wedding reception, Grandpa (Wesley) Carter took Mary’s little brother, Norley, hunting. Norley was sixteen years old and it was his first deer hunt. Because Wes had sold his deer rifle to buy gas to get to his wedding reception he had to borrow a gun.

He and Norley went up Spanish Fork Canyon, shot a nice buck, and were home before noon. Norley was pleased to see his deer hanging under the big tree in the family’s yard in Lake Shore. Grandpa (Laning) and Grandma (Caroline) and a still-younger brother, Bert, were all proud of this accomplishment too.
Love,
Aunt Genni

Friday, July 3, 2009

Gifts

Hello Dear Reader,
The wedding reception ended at about 10 o’clock. Grandpa (Wesley) Carter said, “What a relief it was to get off from my feet! We were too tired when we left the church [so] we left the wedding gifts there until the next morning [when] we picked them up and took them to Lake Shore.”

Wes and Mary were grateful for all who shared the glorious occasion with them and who expressed their love by giving lovely wedding gifts to the bride and groom. The gifts covered the entire front room in the Halls’ home. If any of you remember the room, it was big—at least it seemed big to me but I was fairly young when the house burned down. Maybe someone out there can let us know the dimensions just for curiosity’s sake.
Love,
Aunt Genni

Thursday, July 2, 2009

A Memorable Party

Hello Dear Reader,
Grandpa (Wesley) Carter said he didn’t realize it at the time but being married in the temple followed by the lovely reception was the highlight of his life. Grandma (Mary) Carter’s family had spent days in preparation for the party. Invitations were sent to every family in Lake Shore and to all of Wes’s and Mary’s friends and relatives.

Grandpa (Laning) Hall hired a live orchestra and everyone enjoyed dancing throughout the evening. There was a program. Wes said each person on the program made dumb remarks about the bride and groom—I can just hear the laughter. The refreshments served were chicken sandwiches (from chickens the Hall women raised, killed, plucked, cooked and prepared into sandwich spread), potato chips, pickles, wedding cake, and punch. Sounds good to me!
Love,
Aunt Genni

Wednesday, July 1, 2009

The Reception

Hello Dear Reader,

On October 17, 1940 Grandpa (Laning) and Grandma (Caroline) Wes and Mary WeddingHall gave a reception for the newlyweds in the Spanish Fork First Ward cultural hall. Wes (Carter) had to sell his deer rifle to get enough money for gas for the trip to Spanish Fork that evening. He and Mary arrived at the church building about 7 o’clock and guests started arriving soon after that. 

The evening was a huge success. So many people attended the party it was hard to get them all in the cultural hall. Here’s how the young couple appeared that evening:  

Love,

Aunt Genni

Tuesday, June 30, 2009

Honeymoon


Hello Dear Reader,
As they went back through Provo Caroline dropped Wes and Mary at Hotel Roberts in Provo. That’s where they spent their honeymoon—for one whole night.
Each time we went by the old hotel, which was at 192 South University Avenue, Grandma (Mary) would say, "That's where we spent our honeymoon.
Sadly, the hotel was torn down in 2004. An article in the Deseret News said, "The hotel. . . built in 1883 was once host to myriad of social events. 'It was the social center of Provo for so many years. . .Every women's luncheon, every club meeting, all the BYU social activities — before they moved to the upper campus — were always held there.'"
Love,
Aunt Genni

Monday, June 29, 2009

The Wedding

Hello Dear Reader,
Wes and Mary set their wedding date for October 16th. Meanwhile they made plans and spent as much time together as they could. Sundays were special as they alternately went to dinner at the Halls’ or the Carters’.

When the “big day” eventually came Grandma (Caroline Ferguson) Hall and Mary picked Wes up at his home and they proceeded to the Salt Lake temple where they received their temple endowments and were married for time and all eternity.
Love,
Aunt Genni

Sunday, June 28, 2009

Proposal

Hello Dear Reader,
After Wes met Mary at the train depot in Salt Lake they stopped at a cafĂ© for breakfast before continuing their journey to Lake Shore. Mary snuggled up to Wes’s side and he asked her to be his wife. He said, “Of course she accepted.” They were in love.

The following Sunday, when Mary’s father (Laning Hall) returned home from his job on the railroad, Wes asked him for his daughter’s hand in marriage. Wes said (tongue in cheek), “. . . with my dynamic personality, how could he refuse?”
Love,
Aunt Genni

Saturday, June 27, 2009

Separation

Hello Dear Reader,
Grandma (Mary Hall) Carter went to Nevada in the summer of 1940 to stay with her sister, Myrl. Grandpa (Wesley) Carter took her to the train depot in Salt Lake to see her off on her six-week trip. I haven’t found any information about what the two of them did while they were apart. I know that Mary was very close to her sister and spent time with her on more than one occasion.

Wes, meanwhile, was probably saving any money that he would have spent on dates, gas, or such. He went back to Salt Lake City to pick her up when she returned. He said her train arrived early in the morning. She had probably traveled most of the night.
Love,
Aunt Genni

Friday, June 26, 2009

Big Spender

Hello Dear Reader,
Occasionally Wes (Carter) took Mary (Hall) to a show, or a movie as we would refer to it today. The price was 25¢ apiece. Their treat was a package of Walnettos which cost 5¢and a 5¢ package of peanuts. Wes said, “In those days I was known as a man about town and a big spender.”

In the summer Wes played softball for the Pioneer Ward M-Men team. His team won the regional championship and went to Salt Lake to compete in the All-church tournament. Wes said, “Of course, I took Mary along. She proved to be my [best] fan and supporter. By then we were going very steady.”
Love,
Aunt Genni

Thursday, June 25, 2009

Courting

Hello Dear Reader,
Grandpa (Wesley) Carter was still working for Christiansen Construction Company for $3 a day. He was paying for a car, helping support his family, and courting his wife to be. But he always managed to have a few dollars in his pocket at the end of the week. He and Mary often went to Saturday night dances for the price of $1 per couple.

If you go to the playlist at the bottom of the blog you will find a few added songs beginning with number 9. These are some of the songs that Mary (who loved dancing) and Wes (who was a great dancer) danced to while they were dating.
Love,
Aunt Genni

Wednesday, June 24, 2009

The Checker Challenge

Hello Dear Reader,
When Grandpa (Wesley) Carter went to Lake Shore to pick Mary up for a date Grandpa (Laning) Hall was waiting and invited him to play a game of checkers. One of Wes’s responses was, “I don’t know much about it so I’ll pass.” Another time he said, “No Sir, you’re too good for me.” In this way he avoided humiliating himself. Mary said, “And Daddy liked him better than anybody.”
Love,
Aunt Genni

Tuesday, June 23, 2009

Obstacles

Hello Dear Reader,
Grandpa (Wes) continued to see Grandma (Mary) at Anna Stone’s house. He said he could tell that she wasn’t really interested in Boyd Christiansen so he started flirting with her and after a few weeks they started dating.

Mary went home to Lake Shore on weekends. Wes, by saving his meager earnings, had bought himself a 1938 Plymouth coupe. The car eliminated one obstacle to their courting as he could then go to Lake Shore each weekend to see Mary as well as seeing her three or four other times during the week.

The next obstacle was Grandpa (Laning) Hall with his checker board.
Love,
Aunt Genni

Monday, June 22, 2009

Lanky


Hello Dear Reader,
I thought you might like to see a picture of Grandpa (Wesley) Carter in action. Here it is:
He was pretty lanky.
Love,
Aunt Genni

Sunday, June 21, 2009

Softening Attitude

Hello Dear Reader,
I don’t exactly know how it came to be that Mary attended some of Wes’s basketball games. He was doing great in church tournaments playing on the “M Men” team for Pioneer Ward in Provo. Mary was beginning to see some appealing characteristics in Wes—his ability to work hard, his kindness to the underdog, his way with people, and his determination to succeed.

She was a little shocked to see him in a basketball uniform though. He was tall and thin. He looked skinny to her. Not too long ago that she mentioned his appearance to me again. She kind of laughed and said, “I thought he looked really strange. Well, he wasn’t too bad, but basketball shorts used to be really short and he had a really long neck.”
Love,
Aunt Genni

Saturday, June 20, 2009

Attraction

Hello Dear Reader,
Boyd Christiansen must have thought the young lady, Mary Hall, who worked for his sister was attractive because it wasn’t long until he had a date with her for a dance on New Year’s Eve. Actually it was a triple date—Boyd’s friend, Wes Carter, took one of Mary’s friends who will remain unnamed and Harold Webb, another friend, took Mary Ellen Argyle as blind dates.

As it turned out Mary Ellen was six inches taller than Harold and was afraid to get out of the car. Wes said, “And I was stuck with a girl whose face would stop an eight-day clock.” But Boyd and Mary seemed to have a wonderful time. Mary was less than impressed with Boyd’s friends, however, and thought Wes was the rudest person she had ever met.
Love,
Aunt Genni

Friday, June 19, 2009

The Rescue

Hello Dear Reader,
As they worked together, Boyd Christiansen and Grandpa (Wes) Carter continued to be good friends. During the Christmas holidays in 1938 they went skating on Utah Lake with another friend Don Waterlyn. Boyd and Wes skated along together until the ice broke and they went into the icy water. They tried to climb out but the ice kept breaking under their weight.

Boyd had presence of mind enough to tell Wes to take off his coat. Boyd took his off as well. They threw them to Don who tied the sleeves together to form a makeshift rope. By throwing the “rope” back Don was able to pull Boyd and Wes out of the water. By the time they reached shore their clothes were frozen stiff and they could hardly walk. They were lucky. I personally know of four people who drowned in Utah Lake by unknowingly skating onto thin ice or into warm springs.

When Wes got home Grandma (Annie Blake) Carter made him get in a tub of hot water. Wes didn’t even get a cold.
Love,
Aunt Genni

Thursday, June 18, 2009

Gaining Life Experience

Hello Dear Reader,
Grandpa (Wes) Carter said, “. . . . Our team was good enough to go to the Church Regional playoffs. We got beat in the final game by the Provo 4th Ward in a double-overtime. The 4th Ward was good enough to go on and win the all-church championship.”

Wes continued to work for Axel Christiansen. They built a triplex for Anna Stone. Anna was Axel’s daughter and Boyd’s sister. Wes’s salary was $18.00 a week for six days. In other words, Wes made $3.00 a day. But he was learning a lot and gaining experience.
Love,
Aunt Genni

Wednesday, June 17, 2009

More About Grandpa (Wes) Carter

Hello Dear Reader,
Here are excerpts from two newspaper articles in Grandpa (Wes) Carter’s scrapbook: “With the first half of “M” Men play completed in Utah stake (with the exception of two postponed games), Wes Carter, sharpshooting forward of Pioneer [Ward] leads the scoring with 46 points chalked up in three games. The Pioneer star has tallied an average of 15.3 points per game. His total is a few points better than Bill Mangum’s. . . “

“A great little ball player, Wes Carter, nearly upset the applecart for Fourth. Carter rustled the ball with finesse and came through at the basket with nine field goals and a foul pitch for 19 counters. He was the outstanding player of last night’s games.”

High School was over but basketball wasn’t. It seems he just got better and better.
Love,
Aunt Genni

Tuesday, June 16, 2009

Meanwhile . . . Church Basketball

Hello Dear Reader,
Meanwhile, Grandpa (Wes) Carter went to work again for Boyd Christiansen’s dad, Axel Christiansen. Mr. Christiansen was impressed enough with Wes’s ability as a carpenter than he spent many hours teaching him the building trade. This prepared Wes for his lifetime occupation of building.

There was not much for Wes to do in the way of activities, outside of work, so he played M-Men basketball. “M-Men” stood for “Mutual Men.” These were young men ages sixteen to, I think, about twenty-one, and basketball was part of the Mutual program. Church sports were a big deal back then. I guess they still are in some areas. I haven’t kept up with such things for years.
Love,
Aunt Genni

Monday, June 15, 2009

Household Domestic

Hello Dear Reader,
After some temporary jobs Mary (Hall) went to work in Provo for a lovely woman by the name of Anna Stone. She was a household helper and learned many things from Mrs. Stone. One of Mary’s tasks was doing laundry . Anna was very fussy and taught Mary to be an excellent ironer. Clean, beautifully pressed laundry was something Mary took pride in the rest of her life.

She also did housework for Anna, helped with the cooking, and tended children. I believe that she actually lived with the Stones during the week and went home to Lake Shore on weekends. Meanwhile, she also continued to date.
Love,
Aunt Genni

Saturday, June 13, 2009

Doubtful Ketchup

Hello Dear Reader,
Another job Mary (Hall) had following her high school graduation was working at the cannery in Leland south of Spanish Fork. Del Monte owned the cannery at that time and they were bottling ketchup. I suppose Mary found the job pretty disgusting—she wouldn’t eat ketchup for years afterwards.

I asked her about it one time and she said they just threw in the tomatoes whether they had worms in them or not. Yuck! No wonder she didn’t eat ketchup. Thank goodness standards are higher now—I guess they are anyway.
Love,
Aunt Genni

Friday, June 12, 2009

Fruit Orchards

Hello Dear Reader,
After high school Mary (Hall) had to face reality and find work. Jobs were scarce. One of her summer jobs was picking and sorting fruit for her uncle, Jess Cordner. Jess had married Mary’s Aunt Jen (Sarah Jane). Their fruit orchards were apparently in Orem, or on the Provo Bench, as it used to be called. Utah produces wonderful fruit. It's something about the cool nights and mountain air.

I don’t remember much about the Cordners but I do remember going to Provo Bench to see Mary’s Aunt Ag and Uncle Allen Bellows. They also had orchards. I loved going to see them as they were very kind to me.
Love,
Aunt Genni

Thursday, June 11, 2009

High School Graduation

Hello Dear Reader,

 Mary 1938 Grandma (Mary Hall) Carter graduated from Spanish Fork High School on May 20, 1938. She had enjoyed her school years and developed many friendships and memories that she retained the rest of her life. For graduation she had a pale green chiffon formal and said,” [I] felt very glamorous.”

High School Diploma

Love,

Aunt Genni

Wednesday, June 10, 2009

Embarrassment

Hello Dear Reader,
Grandma (Mary Hall) Carter participated in some extracurricular activities in high school although she was restrained somewhat by having to ride the school bus back to Lake Shore each afternoon. She played basketball in 1936-37, baseball in 1937, and sewed opera costumes for an opera that was put on that same year.

Her cousin, Lila, was the lead singer in the school opera in 1938. Mary could never have done anything like that. Besides not being a great singer she got embarrassed too easily. She probably got that from her dad (Laning). He really didn’t like to see his children perform in public—their performances embarrassed him.
Love,
Aunt Genni

Tuesday, June 9, 2009

Dating Dilemmas

Hello Dear Reader,
Mary (Hall) continued to have lots of dates in high school. Sometimes her family circumstances were an embarrassment to her. Although the lane they lived down seemed a half mile long, it wasn’t. But it was muddy a lot.

One time Mary had a date with Shavey Argyle. In order to pick her up, he rolled his pants legs up to his knees and trod up the muddy lane after her. Mary put on her galoshes and they started out. The mud was so sticky that it sucked her galoshes right off her feet.

They were going to an “Elder’s dance,” one of those put on weekly by the Elders Quorum. They went to the Argyle home first and tried to clean the mud off their legs and feet so they would be somewhat presentable. She said, “It was horrible!”
Love,
Aunt Genni

Monday, June 8, 2009

Rabies

Hello Dear Reader,
Some notes in her yearbook say Grandma (Mary Hall) Carter) was the prettiest girl from Lake Shore and a lot of kids thought she was “fun,” had “a nice personality,” was “a sweet kid,” and was one of “the grandest kids.”

But apparently one young man made a nuisance of himself in his feelings towards her during high school. Mary Ellen Argyle, her best friend, recalled, “Your pet saying, ‘I hate him,’—another one, ‘He’s got hydrophobia.’” Mary seemed to think someone by the name of Johnny Moore was pretty cute though.
Love,
Aunt Genni

Sunday, June 7, 2009

Starving Teenager


Hello Dear Reader,
One of Grandma (Mary Hall) Carter’s memories of high school was the lunch line. She said, “That soup line at school was a real treat—hot soup for 2¢, or an orange and a cookie for 2¢. What a bargain for a starving teenager." She remembered what it was like to be hungry. Maybe that’s one of the reasons she always made sure there was plenty to eat at her house.
Love,
Aunt Genni

Saturday, June 6, 2009

More Tobacco Tales

Hello Dear Reader,
Perhaps one reason Grandpa (Laning) Hall was so against smokers was that his own father was a chain smoker—Jasper rolled his own Bull Durham cigarettes. As soon as he lit one cigarette he would roll another and place it over his ear. He usually had one cigarette in his mouth and one behind each ear.

As he grew older he became somewhat senile and did things that frightened his in-laws and grandchildren. When Grandma (Mary Hall) Carter’s friends asked her what was wrong with her grandfather her standard reply was, “Oh he’s got nicotine of the brain.”
Love,
Aunt Genni

Friday, June 5, 2009

Old Nicotina

Hello Dear Reader,
Grandpa (Laning) Hall teased his girls a lot about their boyfriends. One time Lois, Grandma (Mary) Carter’s sister, had a date with a young man that smoked. The whole family smelled tobacco on him when he came to pick Lois up. They nearly went into shock.

When Lois got up the next morning Laning said, “Well how was ‘Old Nicotina’ last night?” Lois started screaming, had a tantrum, and ran into the bedroom. She flung herself on the bed and pounded her fists on her pillow. The whole family listened to her bawl. Grandpa just called him “Nicotina” and Lois never went out with him again. As far as I know, none of the rest of them ever dated anyone who smoked either.
Love,
Aunt Genni

Thursday, June 4, 2009

Challenges

Hello Dear Reader,
When Lois and Mary were old enough to date their father, (Laning Hall) gave them a bad time. He was a champion checker player but he was also a tease. Every young man that came calling was challenged to a game of checkers. The purpose of this was to see if the boys had enough brains to be worthy of Laning’s daughters. The girls stood and fumed while their dad soundly trounced whoever they had a date with.

One time Mary had a date with someone she “couldn’t have cared less for,” but wanted to see a movie that he had invited her to. Her dad dragged him into the living room and made him play checkers. Mary asked her mother, “Why does he want to test him? I wouldn’t have him if you’d give him to me.”

It didn’t matter. Whoever came calling played checkers with Laning. I think the ordeal was worse for the girls than it was for their dates.
Love,
Aunt Genni

Wednesday, June 3, 2009

Cutting a Dashing Figure

Hello Dear Reader,
Grandma (Mary Hall) Carter and her cousin, Lila, loved to try to ice skate. They didn’t have shoe skates, only clamp-on skates. They needed something to support their ankles. Sometimes they bribed their little brothers to take off their high-top shoes and stay in the house. They clamped the skates onto their brothers’ shoes and wore them to go skating on Wride’s Pond.

They had lots of fun. One time they decided they were going to be figure skaters. They tried going backwards, forwards, and all around. Although they were probably just barely moving, as Mary recalled, they thought they were really doing great. I guess greatness is all in the mind.
Love,
Aunt Genni

Tuesday, June 2, 2009

Transportation by Sleigh

Hello Dear Reader,
Sometimes, in winter when the snow was deep, school buses didn’t run. One year when Grandma (Mary Hall) Carter was in high school it was cold (below zero) and snowy so a big sleigh was brought to the school in Spanish Fork to transport all the kids who lived way out in the country.

When Mary arrived at her house she saw her dad was home pacing up and down waiting for her. She decided to put on a show for him. She said, “Oh, I’m frozen, I’m frozen. I can’t stand it. I’m just stiff I’m so cold. Grandpa (Laning) Hall said, “Throw her in the snow. Throw her in the snow.” Apparently it was a common belief that to treat frost bite the victim should be rubbed with snow. Grandpa tried to wrestle her down but she fought him for all she was worth. She wasn’t that frozen.
Love,
Aunt Genni

Monday, June 1, 2009

High School Fun, Fun, Fun

Hello Dear Reader,
Grandma (Mary Hall) Carter’s best friends through high school were her cousin, Lila Francis, and Mary Ellen Argyle. Mary and Mary Ellen took every class together from the seventh grade through graduation. They shared fond memories of their school days together.

Mary loved riding the bus seven miles from Lake Shore to Spanish Fork every day. She said, “It was an education in itself. We had such fun—singing songs, telling jokes, sitting by someone special, or just giggling with our girl friends.” Mary enjoyed people and loved being with them. She thought having fun was an important part of life and hosted many parties and get-togethers.
Love,
Aunt Genni

Sunday, May 31, 2009

Give That Turkey the Axe

Hello Dear Reader,
Many times Grandma (Mary Hall) Carter went with her Francis cousins when they herded turkeys. One time they went clear to Scipio in Millard County. Lila and Mary had the assignment to watch the birds awhile when Lila’s brothers took a break from the dumb birds. All of a sudden the turkeys took off flying.

The girls ran screaming after them trying to get them to stop. When the birds got where they wanted to go they landed and started eating. Mary and Lila had a hard time getting them turned around and back where they were supposed to be.

Sometimes the cousins got so sick of turkeys they kicked one in the head killing the bird. Then they chopped off its head, removed its feathers, cooked, and ate the turkey they had killed. Revenge!
Love,
Aunt Genni

Saturday, May 30, 2009

Turkey Trot

Hello Dear Reader,
Sometimes Grandma (Mary Hall) Carter went with her cousin Lila Francis to West Mountain where the Francis family had a house and farm where they raised, mainly, turkeys. Lila had to milk a lot of cows and Mary went along to keep her company—Mary really couldn’t milk. Every two weeks, after the milking was done, they walked and ran to "Center" in Lake Shore. They did what they “thought was some kind of Scout thing where you run ten steps and walk ten steps.”

It was a long way from West Mountain to Center. I measured it once and I can’t remember the exact distance but it was way over two miles. When they got to Center they proceeded to get ready and go to a church dance put on by the Elders’ Quorum. Mary said, “We always thought we were so glamorous. We had to make an entrance after they started.” I’m surprised they had any energy left but they did and loved those dances.
Love,
Aunt Genni

Friday, May 29, 2009

Something Up Her Sleeve

Hello Dear Reader,
Lois and Mary (Grandma Carter) both had chores to do at night. Lois hated to do dishes. Mary hated that chore too but Lois was stronger and could milk the cow—Mary didn’t have any strength in her grip. So Lois milked the cow and Mary did the dishes. Lois had a lot of gear that she wore, supposedly to keep warm while she was milking.

One night Lois was getting ready to go do the milking. She put gear on her head and started to put on an old fur coat that her boyfriend, Gus, had donated to the family to wear to the shed. She put her arm in the sleeve and there was a mouse hiding there. Mary said, “Oh, if you’ve ever seen anybody do a dance around the house that was it.” From then on none of the family ever put their coats on until they checked the sleeves.
Love,
Aunt Genni

Thursday, May 28, 2009

Glorious High School

Hello Dear Reader,
By the time Grandma (Mary Hall) Carter started high school she was used to the long bus ride from Lake Shore to Spanish Fork. She loved being a teenager. She said, “I had a glorious time. I loved to dance and all my boy cousins would dance with me at the ward dances. I was always a dancer in any of the road shows that we put on or any other entertainments. “

One year she danced at June Conference in the old Saltair pavilion in Salt Lake. Shavy Argyle, her best friend’s brother was her partner. She always spoke of him fondly. I think she must have had a crush on him—but what a weird name. Do you think he shaved his head?
Love,
Aunt Genni

Monday, May 25, 2009

In Memory of Our Kindred Dead

Hello Dear Reader,
Happy Memorial Day to all of you. I have been working hard to post histories of our ancestors on The Family Thicket to honor our kindred dead on this beautiful day. I know none of the histories I have mention war service but many of these good people sacrificed a lot in order to provide better circumstances for us, their descendants.

When you go to the web site you can access the histories in a couple of different ways. If you don't know the genealogical lines you can go to the site map, expand the view, and click on the history you want to read. The navigation bar provides another way to get to the histories.

If the histories seemed long to me I provided an attachment that you will need to click on. Otherwise, the histories appear on the page of the particular person. If you do need to go to an attachment I have tried to give a brief summary of that person's life on their page.

I still have a couple to finish entering. I will get to them today, if possible. But most are posted. If you find mistakes will you please let me know so everything can be as accurate as possible?
Love,
Aunt Genni

Saturday, May 23, 2009

Another Tribute

Hello Dear Reader,
In all of my sorting I came across another poem. This one was written specifically for Grandma (Mary Hall) Carter by Aretta Ricks. Aretta was Grandma's visiting teacher for many years. She wrote this June 3, 1998. It is entitled Mary

Your faith in Our Father shines in your face.
Your actions show kindness and love.
You bring a sweet feeling of gladness and joy
As you share with your gifts from above.
Your husband and family, your grandchildren too
Have cherished the care you have given.
Your home is a haven, a port in life's storms.
You've made it a wee bit of heaven.
The tasks you've accomplished, no matter how large--
The classes, the dresses, the meals--
All show you're a marvel at getting things done.
Your handiwork brings many thrills!

So here's to you, Mary, may all of your days
Bring sweetness and light into living,
For you've truly found God's secret for joy
Through caring and serving and giving.

Love,
Aunt Genni

Wednesday, May 20, 2009

Back to Grandma's Story

Hello Dear Reader,
Before I return to Grandma (Mary Hall) Carter’s adventures in high school I thought I would share a poem that I came across as I have continued to sort through her papers. She wrote, “Carol, I love this poem! Read it at my funeral. (Just say, ‘This is a poem I gave my mother.’)” Sorry I didn’t find it in time for her funeral. But here it is now:

Family ties somehow don’t seem to mean as much these days—
Most children and their parents seem to go their separate ways,
But we happen to be different in a lot of things we do,
And I will always cherish my special ties with you—
You have a place within my heart that no one else can fill—
I need you and I love you and you know I always will!
Love,
Aunt Genni

Tuesday, May 19, 2009

Making Ends Meet

Hello Dear Reader,
The house Grandpa (Wesley) Carter and his brother, Bill, built for their parents had no electricity or inside toilet facilities. It was lined with cardboard. It must have been difficult to move from their home on Center Street even though the house they moved into was new.

That year Wes went deer hunting, pheasant hunting, and duck hunting. He was successful in each of the hunts. I’m sure his family was grateful for the meat that he provided for them that fall. It was 1938. The country was still experiencing The Great Depression and the Carter family was still struggling.
Love,
Aunt Genni

Monday, May 18, 2009

Building a Home

Hello Dear Reader,
Grandpa (Edward F.) Carter had accumulated a few hundred dollars from his mining lease at Mercur. He was, therefore, able to buy a lot at 1200 West 5th North in Provo. He had enough too to buy material for a frame shell of a house.

Wes had gained building experience working for Cox and Christiansen Company. With the help of Uncle Bill, his older brother, they were able to finish the house and the family moved into it in August that year. The house still stands at that address. Here is a picture of it taken several years ago.
Love,
Aunt Genni


Saturday, May 16, 2009

Trying Times

Hello Dear Reader,
Grandpa (Wesley) Carter graduated from high school in the spring of 1938. In his history he didn’t mention how he did academically. I’m sure he missed being on the sports teams but I don’t know how much he missed school per se.

His family was going through a trying time at this point in his life. His grandfather Blake had died and the family was evicted from the house at 900 West Center. His dad (Edward Furlsbury Carter) had cancer and was unable to work. His mother (Annie Blake Carter) was trying to make ends meet by working as a seamstress at Utah State Hospital, the mental hospital for the state of Utah. Annie’s work fell under the WPA and the family had very little cash; most of Annie's wages were received in food commodities. Definitely times to try the Carter family's souls.
Love,
Aunt Genni

Friday, May 15, 2009

Basketball Hero

Hello Dear Reader,Basketball Heros

The football team did well when Grandpa (Wesley) Carter played as a senior but the basketball team really excelled. Wes said, “I really achieved.” He broke the region scoring record and was selected as forward on the region all-star team.

One time, in a game against Lehi, Wes was fouled with just a few seconds left to play. He made both foul shots winning the game for PHS. He was a hero! Provo went on to win regional championship and went to state. They didn’t do well in Salt Lake but were eliminated after two day’s play. Oh well, he was still handsome.Wes in Basketball Uniform Look at that curly hair!

Love,

Aunt Genni

Thursday, May 14, 2009

Senior Football Squad

Hello Dear Reader,
Despite the sorrow of the previous spring and summer Grandpa (Wesley) Carter continued to play football as a senior at Provo High School. The team did better that year and articles continued to appear in the Evening and Sunday Herald. Here's a picture from the yearbook. Grandpa is in the middle of the front row. Notice the cool uniforms.
Love,
Aunt Genni


Tuesday, May 12, 2009

Sorrow and Grief

Hello Dear Reader,
When Grandpa (Wesley) Carter was a junior in high school his mother, Annie (Blake) Carter received a phone call from a neighbor of his older sister, Beulah Frisby. Beulah had been married for several years, had no children, and was like a second mother to Grandpa. The neighbor said Beulah was sick and her husband, Royal (Tiny), was nowhere to be found. She had been alone for two or three days and they were very concerned about her.

Wes drove his mother to Salt Lake to assess the situation. They found Beulah very ill and were also unable to locate Royal. They took her back to Provo and admittted her to Aird Clinic hospital. The family took turns staying with her twenty-four hours a day.

Wes and his brother, Bill, were staying with her the night she passed away. Wes was alone with her when she died. This was a hard experience for him--one that affected him the rest of his life.
Love,
Aunt Genni

Monday, May 11, 2009

PHS Basketball Team 1936-37




Hello Dear Reader,
For Mother’s Day I received a new digital camera. I decided to try taking a picture from a newspaper clipping in Grandpa (Wesley) Carter’s high school scrapbook so you can see what he looked like when he played basketball as a junior. I haven’t read anything yet about the features of my camera but just took the picture. Here it is! Not bad, eh? The picture is small but Grandpa is third man from the right on the front row. You can see he was a handsome young man—now you grandchildren know where you got your good looks from.
Love,
Aunt Genni

Sunday, May 10, 2009

Hard Times Ahead

Hello Dear Reader,
The Provo High football team did better when they played Spanish Fork and won 13-7. Grandpa (Wes) Carter played in that game. They went to Pocatello, Idaho for their final game of the year and lost the game by fumbles.

Beginning in December they played their first basketball game as reported in the Herald Sunday, December 8th. The basketball team was smaller and very good. They won their first game 25-20. They were off to a good start. In fact, the whole season they played well and did well. Grandpa found success in sports but was about to go through a difficult time with his family.
Love,
Aunt Genni

Saturday, May 9, 2009

Frustrating Football

Hello Dear Reader,
Grandpa (Wesley) Carter continued to grow as a football player although the team did not do well. In a Sunday Herald article dated Sunday October 18, 1936, Provo High tied the team they played but Grandpa was said to have been an outstanding player. The next couple of articles dated October 19, and 22, mention the team’s upcoming trip to Las Vegas. When the game was reported on Monday, October 26, the reporter said the Bulldogs lost to a larger and more experienced team.

They finally had some success against Payson when they won 12-0. Grandpa played in that game. The next team they played that season was Carbon High in Price, Utah. They lost again but reportedly played an outstanding game. The football team didn’t give up, but now it was time to start practicing basketball.
Love,
Aunt Genni

Friday, May 8, 2009

Junior Year Football

Hello Dear Reader,
Grandpa (Wesley) Carter’s junior year on the football team found his name appearing in the newspaper numerous times. It is interesting to note that in games reported on September 24, 27, and October 7, 1936 there is no mention of Wes Carter in the paper--and the Bulldogs lost all three games. But on Sunday October 11, 1936 Wes is mentioned and the Bulldogs tied the game. It was the first positive report of the season. He was pretty light but he was definitely a fighter.
Love,
Aunt Genni

Thursday, May 7, 2009

The Rest of the Trip

Hello Dear Reader,
Anne and I went back to Fort Madison, crossed the Mississippi River, and had lunch in Nauvoo. I love going there. Crossing the river to Hancock county and back to Lee county reminded me of the Ballengers going across to walk through the Nauvoo temple after the Saints had been driven out of the state. At one of our gatherings Wallace Curl mentioned that he also has Ballengers in his genealogy, providing another avenue to persue.

After an hour or two in Nauvoo we continued our journey. Saturday night we stayed in Tennessee. We arrived at Jill's and David's on Sunday where they had prepared a delicious dinner for us. They then stocked our car with food so we wouldn't have to buy anything on Sunday. We arrived in Tampa at about 10:00 Sunday night. We traveled safely with no incident and the car functioned perfectly. I am grateful for that blessing.

By the time you read this I will be back in Utah. I hope to rest this summer, garden, and spend time at the BYU Family History Library catching up and digesting all of the things I've learned this past year.

Tomorrow I will get back to Grandpa (Wesley) Carter's history.
Love,
Aunt Genni

Wednesday, May 6, 2009

Future Reunions

Hello Dear Reader,
There are other McNeills in the Denmark cemetery although Orren and some of his brothers are buried in Marion county. After we made the rubbing of Eliza's headstone we drove a little farther north to a cluster of McNeill headstones. Anne and I felt blessed to have experienced a few hours which connected us with our ancestors and the past, and to have made the acquaintance of good and generous people.

We said, "Good-bye," to Marieta with fondness and a desire to be associated with her again. Marieta said that she felt as though we were meant to know each other. The McNeills are planning another reunion in the fall of 2010. They are looking at dates which would make it possible for me to attend. Marieta would like me to come a few days early so we can look at places between Des Moines and Lee county. I hope I will be able to.
Love,
Aunt Genni

Tuesday, May 5, 2009

Saved by Marieta

Hello Dear Reader,
As Anne and I stood trying to make out the carvings on Eliza's headstone Marieta went to the trunk of her car. She walked back carrying archival paper, masking tape, and several colors of rubbing wax for us to choose from. She taught us how to apply the paper to the headstone and showed us how to rub the wax across the surface of the paper.

To our delight images began to appear and we were able to decipher what was written. A crown and a swagged curtain are at the top of the stone with these words written underneath: Eliza wife of Orren McNeill DIED Dec. 20, 1878, AGED 76 Yrs. 1. Mo. 21 Ds. She was a tender mother here, And in her life the Lord did fear. I will bring the rubbing back to Utah with me.
Love,
Aunt Genni

Monday, May 4, 2009

More Cemeteries

Hello Dear Reader,
As we traveled we viewed the property where Jaybird School had been located. We have connections there. We saw another parcel of land owned by Orren--land I feel was where Eliza lived with her husband and children. From there we went to Lost Creek Cemetery and viewed beautiful headstones with familiar names and heard stories about people buried there.

Then we drove north to Denmark township and the Denmark cemetery. Marieta remarked that they usually visited a certain headstone last but we would be stopping there first that day. I was deeply touched to view the headstone of Eliza Darrow Fifield Bates McNeill, my third great-grandmother. Eliza was buried next to her daughter Louisa Brockway and her husband Wilder Brockway. The headstone for Louisa and Wilder was newer and very readable but Eliza's headstone was old, worn, and very hard to read.
Love,
Aunt Genni

Sunday, May 3, 2009

Touring Lee County

Hello Dear Reader,
Anne suggested that I ride with Marieta and she would follow. We thought it a great idea. Marieta was then able to talk to me as we took our tour. We started by going to property that Orren McNeill had owned. It has not been determined where he and Eliza lived as he owned three parcels of land in Washington Township, Lee County.

We then went to Hickory Cemetery with its old headstones and wild violets growing everywhere. What a lovely place to visit.

From there we drove north by properties owned by Warren McNeill, Salmon McNeill, Samuel McNeill, Solomon McNeill, and Amos McNeill. We drove to the stone house built by Amos McNeill. A tour of this home had been the final activity of the reunion attendees the day before. It had been our hope to make it to that activity. It was enough, though, just to view the outside of the charming old house.
Love,
Aunt Genni

Saturday, May 2, 2009

After the Reunion

Hello Dear Reader,
Before we said, "Good night," to our newly met shirttail relatives we agreed to meet them for breakfast at 8:00 the next morning. When we arrived at the breakfast room there were other good people we were introduced to and immediately felt a connection with. But that was just the start of an amazing day.

The reunion was over and everyone was heading their separate directions. Marieta, however, said she wanted to show us some of the area before she headed back to her home in Indianola near Des Moines. Needless to say we were delighted. She gave me several documents including maps, cemetery records and two sections of her Application Portfolio. She recently became a certified genealogist--the only one in the state of Iowa. Congratulations to her for this well-deserved honor.
Love,
Aunt Genni

Friday, May 1, 2009

McNeills

Hello Dear Reader,
It has occurred to me that you might like to know just what our connection with the McNeill family is. My third great-grandmother, Eliza Darrow, married, as her third husband, Orren McNeill. Her son, Mark G. Fifield (my second great-grandfather), married, as his first wife, Sally McNeill. Eliza's daughter, Emmi Bates (by Eliza's second marriage to Dennis Bates), married Almond McNeill. Eliza's youngest sister, Olive Darrow, married Thomas McNeill. These McNeills were all close relations--some siblings, some cousins.

These connections are some reasons I chose to name my web page, "The Family Thicket." These relationships are confusing. I hope, however, this summer to make these records available to you on the web. And I hope, while I am here in Florida and have access to NewFamilySearch, to add to or combine some records that appear there.
Love,
Aunt Genni

Thursday, April 30, 2009

Connection

Hello Dear Reader,
Ten o'clock at night is late but I was afraid if I didn't call or make contact with someone all of our travel would be in vain. I first called Wally Curl but he didn't answer. I then called Marieta Grissom. Success! She answered the phone. When I explained who I was and that we had just arrived she said that if we would stay in the breakfast room she would get hold of the others and meet us there shortly.

I sat in the breakfast area while Anne took the luggage to our room. In a few minutes Marieta appeared and introduced herself. She's a lovely, happy woman with a great smile and beautiful skin. Then Wally came. He's a tall, handsome, kind, and dignified man--my first e-mail contact with the McNeill family. Cousins Connie and Judy also came. We sat, talked, and laughed for an hour. I felt a definite connection to these good people.
Love,
Aunt Genni

Wednesday, April 29, 2009

Arrival

Hello Dear Reader,
Before Anne and I left Utah I hurriedly pulled a file folder of information on the McNeills and printed out e-mails concerning the McNeill reunion. We didn't have a lot to go on but knew that the attendees were staying in the Comfort Inn in Fort Madison. We arrived there at 10:00 pm Friday night.

The inn had a vacancy so we checked in. I asked if there was a Wallace Curl and/or a Marieta Grissom staying there. Happily they were both still there. Now I had to decide what I should do.
Love,
Aunt Genni

Tuesday, April 28, 2009

More Reunions

Hello Dear Reader,
On Thursday, the day after Grandma (Mary) Carter's funeral, Anne and I left at noon to drive to Florida. Knowing there was to be a reunion of the McNeill (half-siblings and cousins of Mark G. Fifield) descendants in Iowa the previous day through Friday, we opted for the northern route hoping to arrive in time for some activities. We ate supper in Cheyenne, Wyoming and drove on until 10:30 when we stopped in Nebraska the first night.

We continued our trip on Friday. When we realized we wouldn't be in Fort Madison in time for the last scheduled activity we left the freeway and drove south before continuing east. We went through beautiful Iowa country and through Oskaloosa, Mahaska County. We traveled across other counties the Ballingers and Fifields lived in.

We felt Grandma would have been pleased to know the efforts we were making to reunite with distant places and people.
Love,
Aunt Genni

Monday, April 27, 2009

Grandma Carter's Funeral

Hello Dear Reader,
Grandma (Mary) Carter's viewing and funeral were nice. She had lots of people who loved her and many flew in or drove from all over the country to be there. Some came from New Jersey, some from Texas, and others from Alabama, Georgia, Arizona, Florida, Oregon, Colorado, and all over Utah. Many fitting tributes were paid to her.

Her love seemed to spill over to family members as we were reunited, renewed acquaintances, and loved each other. We parted with good feelings and fond remembrances. Grandma left us a wonderful legacy.
Love,
Aunt Genni

Friday, April 17, 2009

In Memoriam

Hello Dear Reader,
This post is to honor the memory of Mary H. Carter. She died this morning at 3:10 am mountain daylight time. She lived a good life and loved her family very much. We will miss her greatly until we are united again.
Love,
Aunt Genni

Thursday, April 16, 2009

Big or Diminutive?

Hello Dear Reader,
Grandpa (Wes) Carter continued in sports his junior year of high school. Twice in his personal history he mentions that because he was held back he was bigger and older which helped him achieve in athletics in high school. I wonder if he was trying to be positive about a bad experience.

In one newspaper clipping in his high school scrapbook it says, “Paced by the diminutive Carter at forward, Provo High basketball team turned back a scrappy crew from Bingham 28 to 20 here Friday. Carter, converting seven points from the foul line, collected 13 points.” He may have been bigger than he was two years earlier but he was far from the biggest man on the team. In some team pictures he looks as though he was the smallest.
Love,
Aunt Genni

Wednesday, April 15, 2009

Summer Work

Hello Dear Reader,
In the summer (I think before Wes’s junior year in high school) he got a job at Pacific States Cast Iron and Pipe Company as a molder. The job paid about $50 a week. If you want to calculate what that translates to in today's dollars, click on The Inflation Calculator (to the right on this page) enter $50, then 1936, then 2009. Grandpa made a lot of money that summer! He said he was able to get a job with the company because they wanted him to play ball for them. He was on their softball team.

As I searched microfilm I came across many articles in the Evening Herald and Sunday Herald about “Provo Pipe’s softball team.” They did very well. All of this is to let you know what a competitor Grandpa (Wes) Carter was.
Love,
Aunt Genni

Tuesday, April 14, 2009

Scarlet Fever

Hello Dear Reader,
I don’t know how many sophomore games were played in the 1935-36 season. There were only 3 reported in the Herald. The last one reported was March 6, 1936. The article said, “Provo Second Team Overwhelms Lehi. Grandpa (Wes) didn’t score at all that game.

The varsity team saw a lot of success that season. They were at a disadvantage sometimes as one forward came down with scarlet fever and was out of play for several weeks. Towards the end of the season another forward came down with scarlet fever. The team, however, lost only one game during regular play—to American Fork. Provo beat American Fork on March 8 to tie for first place in the Alpine district. In the final game American fork beat Provo 29-25 and went on to state. They didn’t win state but Grandpa had a lot of pride in the Provo High team his sophomore year. He was happy to be associated with them.
Love,
Aunt Genni

Monday, April 13, 2009

Great Coach

Hello Dear Reader,
It’s been interesting to read about the success of the Provo High basketball team in 1935-36. Coach Simmons not only coached football he also coached basketball and track. No wonder Grandpa (Wes) Carter had a high opinion of him. On December 19, the Evening Herald reported, “In the sophomore game, the Provo five downed the Nephi ‘dings’ 59-19. No opposing sophomore team has yet been able to score 20 points over the Provoans.”
Love,
Aunt Genni

Sunday, April 12, 2009

More Basketball

Hello Dear Reader,
There’s an article in the December 8, 1935 Sunday Herald which is headlined “Bulldogs Win Third Pre-Season Hoop Game.” At the end of the article it says, “In the sophomore game the Provo team won 36 – 24 with Wes Carter leading the scoring parade.” Grandpa (Wes) made 16 of the 36 points in that game.
Love,
Aunt Genni

Saturday, April 11, 2009

Basketball

Hello Dear Reader,
By November 8, 1935 the Herald was featuring basketball instead of football. Grandpa (Wes) Carter was mentioned as chief among the sophomore players. Another sophomore player from Dixon Junior High was Gordon Mitchell who was in our ward. Both were considered very good players.

In Wes’s history he said he played varsity football and basketball for Provo High his sophomore year. I previously mentioned that he played some football for the varsity team but I have not been able to find proof that he actually played basketball on anything other than the sophomore team. That’s not to say that he wasn’t a substitute in some of the regular games. He was a great basketball player.
Love,
Aunt Genni